Eat The Enemy: A More Sustainable Alternative To Your Pork Chops

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by JAMES GERKEN & AMBER GENUSKE | HUFFINGTON POST | DECEMBER 19, 2014

This story is part of “Eat The Enemy,” a HuffPost series on edible invasive species, non-native plants and animals you can help contain from the comfort of your dinner table. Not all invasive species are edible, and some included in this series can be dangerous, includinglionfish and wild boar. Please take caution when foraging or hunting for your own food.

Millions of Americans love pork products. On average, we eat more than 40 pounds of pork per person every year and the U.S. issecond only to China in pork consumption. That’s a lot of pigs.

More than 100 million pigs are killed every year in the U.S. and the pork industry produced over 23 billion pounds of meat in 2012. The massive industrial operationsneeded to supply America’s pork hunger also have a significant environmental impact. Agriculture, including animal feeding operations, is the most common pollutant of U.S. rivers and streams, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. The enormous, toxic waste lagoons attached to some animal feedlots can even be seen from satellites.

A less destructive, but still frustrating, problem also exists in the U.S.: feral hogs. Over the past several decades, the offspring of escaped domestic pigs, invasive Eurasian wild boars, and hybrids of the two have proliferated across parts of the U.S. In Texas, which may be the epicenter of the problem, an estimated 2.6 million hogs roam free, according to the Houston Chronicle.

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